Family and Consumer Sciences

Department Staff
Mrs. Gayle Dickinson (All-Grades F.A.C.S.)
gdickinson@westville.k12.in.us

Course Descriptions
• Seventh Grade F.A.C.S.
The curriculum at the 7th grade level includes the following topics of study: identifying, managing, and caring for resources; caring for the environment; growing and changing human development; caring for children and others; communication skills involving choices and responsibilities, peer pressure, refusal skills; and roles and responsibilities in positive family relationships.

• Eighth Grade F.A.C.S.
The curriculum at the 8th grade level includes the following topics of study: goal setting; careers; decision making, problem solving and critical thinking; nutrition and wellness; leadership; peer relationships; and conflict prevention and resolution.

• Interpersonal Relationships
Interpersonal Relationships addresses the knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors all students need to participate in positive, caring, and respectful relationships in the family and with individuals at school, in the community, and in the workplace. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate suggested topics into the study of interpersonal relationships. Topics include components of healthy relationships, roles and responsibilities in relationships; functions and expectations of various relationships; ethics in relationships; factors that impact relationships (e.g., power, conflicting interests, peer pressure, life events); establishing and maintaining relationships; building self-esteem and self-image through healthy relationships; communications styles; techniques for effective communication, leadership and teamwork; individual and group goal setting and decision making; preventing and managing stress and conflict; addressing violence and abuse; and related resources, services and agencies. Applications through authentic settings such as volunteer experiences, internships, and service learning are encouraged.

Recommended Grade Level: Grade 9 and up
Credits: One-semester or two-semester course, one credit per semester
Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
A Career Academic Sequence, Career-Technical program, or Flex Credit course
One of the six FACS courses from which students may choose three to fulfill the required Health and Safety credit - see State Rule 511 IAC 6-7-6 (6)
Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and Mathematics and National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences have been integrated into this course.

• Nutrition and Wellness
Nutrition and Wellness enables students to realize the components and lifelong benefits of sound nutrition and wellness practices and empowers them to apply these principles in their everyday lives. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate suggested topics into the study of individual and family issues. Topics include impact of daily nutrition and wellness practices on long-term health and wellness; physical, social, and psychological aspects of healthy nutrition and wellness choices; planning for Wellness and fitness; selection and preparation of nutritious meals and snacks based on USDA Dietary Guidelines including the Food Guide Pyramid; safety, sanitation, storage, and recycling processes and issues associated with nutrition and wellness; impacts of science and technology on nutrition and wellness issues; and nutrition and wellness career paths. Laboratory experiences which emphasize both nutrition and wellness practices are required components of this course. This course is recommended for all students regardless of their career cluster or pathway, in order to build basic nutrition and wellness knowledge and skills, and is especially appropriate for students with interest in human services, wellness/fitness, health, or food and nutrition-related career pathways.

Recommended Grade Level: Grade 9 and up
Credits: One-semester or two-semester course, one credit per semester.
Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
A Career Academic Sequence, Career-Technical program, or Flex Credit course
One of the six FACS courses from which students may choose three to fulfill the required Health and Safety credit - see State Rule 511 IAC 6-7-6 (6)

• Advanced Foods and Nutrition
Advanced Nutrition and Foods is a sequential course that builds on concepts from Nutrition and Wellness or Culinary Arts Foundations. This course addresses more complex concepts in nutrition and foods, with emphasis on contemporary issues, or on advanced special topics such as International, Regional, and/or Cultural Foods; Food Science, Nutrition, or Dietetics; or with emphasis on a particular aspect of the food industry, such as Baking, Catering, or Entrepreneurial Endeavors. Higher order thinking, communication, leadership and management processes will be integrated in classroom and laboratory activities. Topics include: In-depth study of daily nutrition and wellness throughout the life span; Acquiring, organizing, and evaluating information about foods and nutrition; Selecting and preparing nutritious meals; Safety and sanitation in food production; Meal planning and preparation for specific economic, psychological, and nutritional needs; Community and world food concerns, including scarcity and hunger; Advanced impacts of science and technology on nutrition, food, and related tools and equipment; Exploring careers in nutrition and food industries. Laboratory experiences with advanced applications are required. School-based entrepreneurial enterprises, field-based observations/experiences or internships, and service learning activities are recommended.

Recommended Prerequisites: Nutrition and Wellness or permission of instructor
Credits: One-semester or two-semester course, one credit per semester - course may be repeated for up to four semesters to accommodate a variety of special topics in advanced nutrition and foods
A Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors, and Core 40 with Technical Honors diploma elective and directed elective course
A Career Academic Sequence, Career-Technical program, or Flex Credit course

• Child Development and Planning
Child Development and Parenting addresses the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors associated with supporting and promoting optimal growth and development of infants and children. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate suggested topics into the study of child development and parenting. The focus is on research-based nurturing and parenting practices and skills, including brain development research, that support positive development of children. Topics include consideration of the roles, responsibilities and challenges of parenthood; human sexuality; adolescent pregnancy; prenatal development; preparation for birth; the birth process; meeting the physical, social, emotional, intellectual, moral, and cultural growth and developmental needs of infants and children; impacts of heredity, environment, and family and societal crisis on development of the child; meeting children's needs for food, clothing, shelter, and care giving; caring for children with special needs; parental resources, services, and agencies; and career awareness. Applications through authentic settings such as volunteer experiences, internships, and service learning are encouraged. This course is recommended for all students regardless of their career cluster or pathway to build basic parenting skills and is especially appropriate for students with interest in human services and education-related careers.

Recommended Grade Level: Grade 10 and up
Credits: One-semester or two-semester course, one credit per semester (Schools offering this course for two semesters may title the course(s) "Child Development and Parenting 1" and "Child Development and Parenting 2", or they may use "Child Development" for one semester and "Parenting" for the other semester)

Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
A Career Academic Sequence, Career-Technical program, or Flex Credit course
One of the six FACS courses from which students may choose three to fulfill the required Health and Safety credit - see State Rule 511 IAC 6-7-6 (6)

• Advanced Child Development
Advanced Child Development is a sequential course that addresses more complex issues of child development and early childhood education with emphasis on guiding physical, social, emotional, intellectual, moral and cultural development throughout childhood, including school age children. Topics include positive parenting and nurturing across ages and stages; practices that promote long-term well-being of children and their families; developmentally appropriate guidance and intervention strategies with individuals and groups of children. Students will access, evaluate, and utilize information, including research results to meet needs of children, including children with a variety of disadvantaging conditions. Students will explore selected child-related careers. Authentic applications are required through school-based experiences with children in locations such as observation/interaction laboratories, preschools, elementary schools, or daycare settings. This course is recommended for any student for enrichment and as a foundation for students with interests in any child-related career or profession.

• Fashion and Textiles
Fashion and Textiles Foundations addresses knowledge and skills related to design, production, acquisition, and distribution in fashion and textiles arenas. Topics include exploration of textiles and fashion industries; elements of science and design in textiles and apparel; textiles principles and applications; social, psychological, cultural and environmental aspects of clothing and textiles selection; clothing and textile products for people with special needs; critical thinking applied to consumer options for fashion, textiles, and related equipment and tools; care and maintenance of textile products, equipment, and tools; impacts of technology; construction and alteration skills; contemporary issues, including global applications. Work-based, entrepreneurial, experimental, laboratory, and/or service learning experiences are to be included; and portfolio activities are required.

Recommended Grade Level: Grade 9 and up
Credits: One-semester or two-semester course, one credit per semester (May be taken for more than one year, with progressive advancement of content standards and technical skills each semester)
Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
A Career Academic Sequence, Career-Technical program, or Flex Credit course

• Housing and Interior Design
Housing and Interior Design Foundations addresses selecting and planning living environments to meet the needs and wants of individuals and families throughout the family life cycle. Topics to be studied include: housing styles, locations, zones, restrictions, and ownership options; managing resources to provide shelter; environmental and energy issues; impacts of technology; housing to meet social needs; elements and principles of design related to interiors, housing, and architecture; creating functional, safe and aesthetic spaces; historical aspects and contemporary trends in housing, interiors, furniture; exploration of housing-related careers. This course is recommended for any student for enrichment and as a foundation for students with interests in any career or profession related to housing, interiors, and furnishings.

• Adult Roles and Responsibilities
Adult Roles and Responsibilities builds knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors students will need as they prepare to take the next steps toward adulthood in today's ever-changing society. This focus is on becoming independent, contributing, and responsible participants in family, community, and career settings. Topics include living independently and family formation; analysis of personal standards, needs, aptitudes, and goals; integration of family, community, and career responsibilities; consumer choices and decision making related to nutrition and wellness, clothing, housing, and transportation; and financial management.